Meditation Diagram No. 33 (of an endless series)

Meditation Diagram No. 33 (of an endless series)

"Hollywood makes money sensationalizing the norm. They can take any situation no matter how good or pure and turn it into a nightmare. We do not support in any way, shape or form any medium that sensationalizes or adds to coulrophobia or ‘clown fear’. Clowns to killers, I choose not to play into any of it. The more attention we give it just gives it more fuel."

Glenn Kohlberger pka Clyde D. Scopepresident of Clowns of America International, attacking the new killer-clown season of American Horror Story. (via twiststreet)

CLOWNS FEAR “CLOWN FEAR”

One of a series of books where I figured out what I was doing.

One of a series of books where I figured out what I was doing.

altcomics said: "white male experience: view world as hall of mirrors, everything is me and i am everything (leads to individualist interpretation of social reality)"

¯\_(ツ)_/¯

This photo is kind of funny, because the angle means he would actually see the camera and photographer in the mirror. It’s obviously very posed and artificial, a fake decisive moment. We easily read it as him looking at himself in the mirror and drawing himself, because we see his eyes in the mirror looking towards the left, and our minds are fooled by the 2-dimensional logic of the picture. But this means he’s really looking to the left of the mirror. As if to draw his own face he has to look somewhere outside the window. Coincidentally I’ve been working all day on drawing my character Glenn Ganges looking at himself in a mirror and I’ve had to deal with all these tricks/paradoxes of mirrors and perspective. It’s true, drawing is something like meditation, but meditation is also a lot like looking at yourself in a mirror over your own shoulder.
austinkleon:

Henri Cartier-Bresson drawing himself in a mirror, 1992
Not a lot of people know this, but Henri Cartier-Bresson actually left photography at one point to pursue his first love: drawing. He wrote of their differences in The Mind’s Eye:

Photography is, for me, a spontaneous impulse coming from an ever-attentive eye, which captures the moment and its eternity…Photography is an immediate reaction, drawing a meditation.

Later in life, in 1983, after an exhibit of his drawings was shown at the MoMA, his friend Saul Steinberg wrote him a nice note about his drawings:

I often look at your drawings in the Museum of Modern Art catalogue. To my mind, photography was a form of gymnastics for you, a sort of decoy, an alibi for your real thing in life.

I was reminded of Cartier-Bresson when I read this Fast Company article about a man who, inspired by Craig Thompson’s brilliant Carnet de Voyage, stopped taking any photos for a year, and drew instead.
See also: Roger Ebert on sketching

This photo is kind of funny, because the angle means he would actually see the camera and photographer in the mirror. It’s obviously very posed and artificial, a fake decisive moment. We easily read it as him looking at himself in the mirror and drawing himself, because we see his eyes in the mirror looking towards the left, and our minds are fooled by the 2-dimensional logic of the picture. But this means he’s really looking to the left of the mirror. As if to draw his own face he has to look somewhere outside the window. Coincidentally I’ve been working all day on drawing my character Glenn Ganges looking at himself in a mirror and I’ve had to deal with all these tricks/paradoxes of mirrors and perspective. It’s true, drawing is something like meditation, but meditation is also a lot like looking at yourself in a mirror over your own shoulder.

austinkleon:

Henri Cartier-Bresson drawing himself in a mirror, 1992

Not a lot of people know this, but Henri Cartier-Bresson actually left photography at one point to pursue his first love: drawing. He wrote of their differences in The Mind’s Eye:

Photography is, for me, a spontaneous impulse coming from an ever-attentive eye, which captures the moment and its eternity…Photography is an immediate reaction, drawing a meditation.

Later in life, in 1983, after an exhibit of his drawings was shown at the MoMA, his friend Saul Steinberg wrote him a nice note about his drawings:

I often look at your drawings in the Museum of Modern Art catalogue. To my mind, photography was a form of gymnastics for you, a sort of decoy, an alibi for your real thing in life.

I was reminded of Cartier-Bresson when I read this Fast Company article about a man who, inspired by Craig Thompson’s brilliant Carnet de Voyage, stopped taking any photos for a year, and drew instead.

See also: Roger Ebert on sketching

found outside the library

found outside the library

craghead:

a drawn walk back from making a video walking towards Matt (his video). Made for The Bridge's WALK THE CITY project. (walk from here to here)

Warren’s walkin’ comics. (walkomix? walkcomics?). It’s a form that works p. well in comics. There’s a bunch of good ones. Somebody should write up a list and write about the varieties and possibilities.